Author Topic: Ecobuddhism  (Read 1467 times)

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Ecobuddhism
« on: November 22, 2011, 04:03:17 am »
Ran across this website today during my morning reading:

http://www.ecobuddhism.org/bcp/all_content/buddhist_declaration/

_/\_Ron

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2011, 04:06:05 am »
Reference is made to a long list of Buddhist Teachers supporting the concept of ecobuddhism.  Apparently, they wrote a book.:

http://www.ecobuddhism.org/bcp/all_content/book_contents_overview_excerpts/
_/\_Ron

Offline Hanzze

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2011, 04:42:25 am »
Great work as today's awareness grows step by step into the Buddhas concept of waste (vedana) management. Form today's believe in recycling and transforming into simply waste (vedana) prevention.  *smile*

There is no better problem management as the Buddha Dharma.

Quote
"Now, brahman, if the thought should occur to you, 'Perhaps Gotama the contemplative is even today not free of passion, not free of aversion, not free of delusion, which is why he resorts to isolated forest & wilderness dwellings,' it should not be seen in that way. It's through seeing two compelling reasons that I resort to isolated forest & wilderness dwellings: seeing a pleasant abiding for myself in the present, and feeling sympathy for future generations."

-MN4


Quote
Bhikkhus, seeing two good reasons I abide in jungle forests and the out skirts of the forest. What are the two?

For my pleasant abiding here and now and out of compassion for the future generation. Bhikkhus, seeing these two good reasons I abide in jungle forests and the out skirts of the forest.

-AN.II.31
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 06:21:31 am by Hanzze »

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2011, 07:21:15 am »
Ran across this website today during my morning reading:

http://www.ecobuddhism.org/bcp/all_content/buddhist_declaration/


The first mindfulness training in Interbeing now includes a reference to global warming.

CP

Offline ground

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2011, 10:58:28 pm »
Renunciation always has been the basis of the path which leads to perfection of renunciation.
Global warming does not change anything about this and it does not add anything new to this.
When there is this then that arises ...

Kind regards

Offline Hanzze

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2011, 11:37:59 pm »
I would not say that, experiences suffering is the require to the way out of suffering. *smile*

Offline pickledpitbull

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2011, 08:51:19 am »
An excerpt by Hozan Alan Senauke in the book states, "The Bodhisattva precepts boil down to one essential principle: not to live at the expense of other beings. This is simple to say, and very difficult to do. Each of us must take complete responsibility for the world, as if the world’s fate depended on our words and actions. Whether we know it or not, it does." 

However contentious the theory of global warming is, there are certain Buddhist tenets which must be observed.
1.  Our actions have an effect.
2.  Once we have become aware of these effects, future actions are volitional.
3.  Our actions affect others, in this and in future lifetimes (such as those of our children).
4.  Impermanence

So when you choose to purchase products that have an adverse effect on the environment, you should be aware of the karma you are creating.  And this is not limited to the "global warming" issue.  It has to do with the disposal of electronic products, the purchase of new or recycled paper, products containing BPA or PVC, whether you buy organic, if you buy seasonally or locally, etc.  It all has an effect.

And the effect is not always obvious, or the solution black and white.

There was a time, not long ago, when the Hudson River was so polluted that it was only good for commerce and parlor jokes.  The fishing industry was obsolete because the catch was too polluted to eat.  For those of you who will respond "I don't eat fish, anyway," it's important to remember that birds and other fish don't have this choice and the health of a river has an enormous impact on the rest of the ecosystem.  There are also many communities which depend on this river for their water source.

Today, I'm happy to say that the Hudson River, while not pristine, is back on track.  You can swim and fish in it again, and the wildlife is making a comeback.  This was accomplished through awareness, legislation, and a change in the attitudes of the people from acceptance to outrage.  Numerous debates ensued about the need to dredge the river of PCB-contaminated soil and the result of stirring up the mess, or just letting it lie and allowing nature to cover it up with subsequent layers of silt (thus saving a very large blue-chip company millions).  There were valid arguments for both sides, but the ultimate result was that people became involved with the well-being of the environment.

The Hudson is not the only US river affected by pollution.  In June of 1969, the Cuyuhoga River in Ohio burst into flames for the fourth time.  Again, this very polluted river is making a comeback, made possible mostly by awareness and outrage.

So, while the issue (and cause) of global warming is debatable, the effects of pollution in general are not.  I think that creating awareness of the effects of our actions is beneficial, whatever you call the final result.

On the other hand, creating a non-existent crisis is also bad, because it ruins the credibility of the scientific community.

So one must go with the gut here, and perceive your own truth.  For instance, I know that sitting in a garage with the car running and the door shut will kill me, but not because it got warmer in the garage.

Peace
You've been taught that there is something wrong with you and that you are imperfect, but there isn't and you're not.


~ Cheri Huber

Offline Amitayus

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2012, 09:19:00 pm »
eco is over used of resources. like in the military, the weapons, military equipment, war ships plane that need a lot of fuel, electrical supply and complementary products. Nasa to space also problem like spacecraft, satelite. this is a little over used. what human need is very small within earth. so to be eco efficient and effective, reducing them will be long term good.

Offline Hanzze

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Re: Ecobuddhism
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2012, 10:31:08 pm »
Where to start? *smile*

 


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