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General Buddhism => Open Discussion => Topic started by: Anemephistus on October 01, 2020, 01:44:39 AM

Title: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Anemephistus on October 01, 2020, 01:44:39 AM
There are sooo many different facets of wisdom, so many different experiences and considerations which relate to Buddhism and Buddhist teaching. Each of us has been contemplating a specific thing or set of things I would estimate. Perhaps even more than one.

What have you all been working on?
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 01, 2020, 09:56:18 PM
There are sooo many different facets of wisdom, so many different experiences and considerations which relate to Buddhism and Buddhist teaching. Each of us has been contemplating a specific thing or set of things I would estimate. Perhaps even more than one.

What have you all been working on?

Othering
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Anemephistus on October 03, 2020, 12:32:34 AM
There are sooo many different facets of wisdom, so many different experiences and considerations which relate to Buddhism and Buddhist teaching. Each of us has been contemplating a specific thing or set of things I would estimate. Perhaps even more than one.

What have you all been working on?

Othering

If I follow you correctly...That's a real middle ground doozy. All subjective communication requires a certain amount of conventional othering for reference even when we maintain awareness it's not the truth. Never-mind the underlying implications....I will just leave that there...a few ways to see it I think. 
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 07, 2020, 06:33:27 PM
Sorry, I don't even know what othering is.  As to my main practice, it is mind training/lojong.  I use the Eight Verses for Training the Mind which begin

By thinking of all sentient beings
As more precious than a wish-fulfilling jewel
For accomplishing the highest aim,
I will always hold them dear.

The complete text is at

https://www.lotsawahouse.org/tibetan-masters/geshe-langri-thangpa/eight-verses-training-mind

Getting up in the morning, I read them and then try to apply them throughout the day.  In the evening, I review the job I have done -- usually not very good!  Especially considering that my life does not bring me in close contact with crazy minds such as criminals, even when dealing with ordinary people all kinds of thoughts and attitudes arise.  Guess more work is needed :)
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 09, 2020, 01:49:29 AM
Sorry, I don't even know what othering is. 

Othering is term I use to describe the use of other as a means to bolster our sense of self.

We can't  help but live with a perception of self and other.  One cannot exist without the other. 

I'm not talking bout simply recognizing other when it arises.  Rather I see that there are times when we make a comparison of ourself to other to make us feel better.  We look for a fault in other and we don't  see that fault in ourself so we feel better.  We are superior.

This is like thought.  It arises and dissolves.  It's  interesting to contemplate how othering enters into our perception and the role it plays.  It's  like thought entering our awareness in meditation.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 11, 2020, 12:40:10 AM
Sorry, I don't even know what othering is.  As to my main practice, it is mind training/lojong.  I use the Eight Verses for Training the Mind which begin

By thinking of all sentient beings
As more precious than a wish-fulfilling jewel
For accomplishing the highest aim,
I will always hold them dear.

The complete text is at

https://www.lotsawahouse.org/tibetan-masters/geshe-langri-thangpa/eight-verses-training-mind

Getting up in the morning, I read them and then try to apply them throughout the day.  In the evening, I review the job I have done -- usually not very good!  Especially considering that my life does not bring me in close contact with crazy minds such as criminals, even when dealing with ordinary people all kinds of thoughts and attitudes arise.  Guess more work is needed :)

the eight worldly concerns is a very helpful contemplation, your link brought a lot of much needed peace of mind to my day, thanks...

My contemplations? Mostly just concerning what i really want out of this world we live in, ugly ressentiment and how to keep myself from spewing it on other people, questions about what people are going to be like in the future. Stuff that isn't terribly important. Meditation has been super difficult over the past couple of months, luckily i've found other coping mechanisms...
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 12, 2020, 06:35:21 PM
The eight verses of Mind Training are not the eight worldly concerns, they can probably serve as an antidote to them:

gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disgrace, pleasure and pain.

There are many mind training/lojong systems and a lot of literature on them -- I will see if I can post more texts later on.

If meditation is difficult, did you try metta meditation beginning with generating metta for yourself?
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 12, 2020, 08:14:20 PM
The eight verses of Mind Training are not the eight worldly concerns, they can probably serve as an antidote to them:

gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disgrace, pleasure and pain.

There are many mind training/lojong systems and a lot of literature on them -- I will see if I can post more texts later on.

If meditation is difficult, did you try metta meditation beginning with generating metta for yourself?

No i haven't, what i've been doing mostly is just integrating mindfulness into my days, reflect on how satisfaction of my whims doesn't mean i'm going to feel any better as i've learned through experience so many times, structured meditation has always been difficult for me so at the moment i'm just putting it on the back burner until im ready for it again. I try to integrate the loving kindness stuff just into my general social interactions, cooing at animals too and petting them...
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 14, 2020, 05:20:52 PM
All this sounds like a good start.  I wonder why you have a problem with structured meditation -- is it because you were introduced to meditation via Zen?  I tried it once and found it very rigid, which is probably because of its connection with Japanese culture.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 14, 2020, 08:57:55 PM
All this sounds like a good start.  I wonder why you have a problem with structured meditation -- is it because you were introduced to meditation via Zen?  I tried it once and found it very rigid, which is probably because of its connection with Japanese culture.

I found the same as you, Gib.  As much as I respect the tradition, I just can't to zazen.  I simply cann't sit stock-still for more than 20 minutes, if that.  Tibetan practices work a lot better for me.  Just the same, Tibetan practices have their structure as well.  I've also got to where I have to use a chair for sitting meditation - I need at least 15" between my butt and the floor. 
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 14, 2020, 09:04:59 PM
Here's something else that might be of value.

My guru teaches something called "Analytical Meditation".  It's a good contemplative practice. 

I can't find anything my guru but I did find a good intro by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche on youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYYuFnJXLPU
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 14, 2020, 10:59:37 PM
Thank you for sharing this video, Chaz.  That's a really good introduction to meditation, full of sensible advice from a seasoned meditation master.  Too many people jump in, overexert themselves, and then just drop it.  It does not have to be this way.  Meditation does not have to be perfect -- as YM Rinpoche says, just a little bit at a time, but methodically, works well and adds up. 

The Tibetan-style practice allows for relaxed sitting and nobody will be shocked if you wriggle a bit.  I, too, sit on a chair sometimes.  Also, the zafu does not work for many Westerners and maybe a rectangular cushion might be better.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 15, 2020, 10:57:57 PM
Thank you for sharing this video, Chaz.  That's a really good introduction to meditation, full of sensible advice from a seasoned meditation master.  Too many people jump in, overexert themselves, and then just drop it.  It does not have to be this way.  Meditation does not have to be perfect -- as YM Rinpoche says, just a little bit at a time, but methodically, works well and adds up. 

I think it's quite common for people to develop a sort-of "merit badge mentality" and pile on every empowerment and practice they can.  In the Shambhala lineage they actually have pins for having undertaken certain levels of practice.  That's not to say that being able to do a bunch of different practices is necessarily a bad thing.  It's not, but starting to do practices for the sake of doing more practices or before sufficient strength in practice has been achieved isn't wise.

And as you suggested, exhausting.

Quote
The Tibetan-style practice allows for relaxed sitting and nobody will be shocked if you wriggle a bit.  I, too, sit on a chair sometimes.  Also, the zafu does not work for many Westerners and maybe a rectangular cushion might be better.

Zafus are too low for me and I find a Gomden uncomfortable.  I'm also a big fan to the easy-going nature of Tibetan practices.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 16, 2020, 03:22:28 AM
i find it very interesting that in other meditation traditions the "total stillness" you find in zen is not the norm, because i thought the sitting still is was meditation is, that's typically why during the sessions, they do a 1/2 hour of sitting, then 5 minutes of walking meditation (kinhin), then another half hour of zazen. I've done a half hour of zazen each day for a couple weeks, but usually i start to find it a little masochistic...the nuts and bolts of meditation practice are very interesting to me...especially what people typically look to get out of it.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 16, 2020, 07:01:08 PM
the nuts and bolts of meditation practice are very interesting to me...especially what people typically look to get out of it.

Different strokes, seems.  Some folks want some things and other people others.

I'll echo Trungpa in that for me "the path is the goal".  It's not where it ends, or where it began.  For me, it's what lies between - where it is, now.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 17, 2020, 09:55:06 PM
You did well keeping up 30 minutes of zazen every day for two weeks, M&B.  But there are other styles.  In the Tibetan tradition, probably following up on the Indian practices, sitting is relaxed.  The more you sit, the stiller you eventually become.   But no one will hit you with a stick if you move a little.  It is good to practice mindfulness of, for example, breathing in this way.

Metta meditation and general setting the motivation can be done even while lying in bed, first thing in the morning.  It charges up the mind for the day ahead.

I have read of a woman in Asia who perfected mindfulness practice.  She did it although her father-in-law did not let her leave home.  When asked how she managed it, she said: "I stirred the rice very mindfully".
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 17, 2020, 09:55:49 PM
Talking about merit pins and badges, that is a seriously bad idea.  Brings up all kinds of worldly concerns and spiritual materialism issues.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 17, 2020, 11:12:33 PM
You did well keeping up 30 minutes of zazen every day for two weeks, M&B.  But there are other styles.  In the Tibetan tradition, probably following up on the Indian practices, sitting is relaxed.  The more you sit, the stiller you eventually become.   But no one will hit you with a stick if you move a little.  It is good to practice mindfulness of, for example, breathing in this way.

Metta meditation and general setting the motivation can be done even while lying in bed, first thing in the morning.  It charges up the mind for the day ahead.

I have read of a woman in Asia who perfected mindfulness practice.  She did it although her father-in-law did not let her leave home.  When asked how she managed it, she said: "I stirred the rice very mindfully".

i guess we are getting into some of the darker aspects of buddhism!

most of the zen centers in the U.S. don't have the stick whacking practices since our culture is very sensitive to touch and physical violence, yet i have heard that normally when it is used it's done pretty moderately or softly, it's a way to get you to stay present in a your meditation...which overall is what real zen buddhism is all about. It's about taking your existence way too seriously, yet also thinking that nothing is that important (non-attachment), i don't really like it. It's definitely appealing for people who are kinda hard on themselves, or who can transcend a religious discipline to help them out in their daily lives (think a lot of christianity, opus dei, islam, etc...)

I had to stop aspiring to make progress up the zen ladder when i tried mimicking a monastic practice of waking up at 5:30am in the morning, which seems to be normal in a lot of buddhist temples. I was able to do it for like a week, but it just made me tired and unhappy, yet it did unlock a stronger part of myself where i'm capable of not getting too emotionally screwed up even in tense circumstances, kind of like what people do in the military.

 :-\
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 18, 2020, 01:10:57 AM
Talking about merit pins and badges, that is a seriously bad idea.  Brings up all kinds of worldly concerns and spiritual materialism issues.

Yes.  Although I'm not one to disrespect another person's practice and it's expession, when I was involved with Shambhala, it was something I couldn't get comfortable with.  It was wild.  For special occassions people would dress up, wearing their pins, which are quite nice.  But after reading Trungpa's teaching on Spiritual Materialism, I found I couldn't understand how his students  would go for something as materialistic as those merit badges.  I didn't stay in the Mandala long enough to figure it out.

Just rhe same, and despite my discomfort with the more superficial aspects of this merit badge mentality, i would later catch myself in a similar setting.  For a while, I was snatching up every empowerment I could and every practice that could lead to more.  It was same mindset but without the physical symbols. That's what brought me back to my first instruction and a simpler practice.


Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 20, 2020, 09:59:59 PM
i guess we are getting into some of the darker aspects of buddhism!

most of the zen centers in the U.S. don't have the stick whacking practices since our culture is very sensitive to touch and physical violence, yet i have heard that normally when it is used it's done pretty moderately or softly, it's a way to get you to stay present in a your meditation...which overall is what real zen buddhism is all about. It's about taking your existence way too seriously, yet also thinking that nothing is that important (non-attachment), i don't really like it. It's definitely appealing for people who are kinda hard on themselves, or who can transcend a religious discipline to help them out in their daily lives (think a lot of christianity, opus dei, islam, etc...)

I had to stop aspiring to make progress up the zen ladder when i tried mimicking a monastic practice of waking up at 5:30am in the morning, which seems to be normal in a lot of buddhist temples. I was able to do it for like a week, but it just made me tired and unhappy, yet it did unlock a stronger part of myself where i'm capable of not getting too emotionally screwed up even in tense circumstances, kind of like what people do in the military.

 :-\

I can totally see how the practice of getting gentle correction with a stick can be of value.  But, as you mentioned, not everyone needs it!  Different strokes (!) for different folks.  Getting up at 5:30 is actually merciful -- the one time I tried Zen practice, we got up around 3am as I remember.  That was quite a few years back at Green Gulch Farm.

The point is that meditation should not be some awful struggle, done with a military mindset.  It is far better to look forward to the session rather than dread it.  I have heard advice that, at the beginning, it is a good idea to sit a little less than you are able to, so that at the end of the session, you feel like you could go on.  Even 15 minutes at a time is good.  Then extend the time gradually. 

The most important, indeed crucial, thing is to build regularity, the habit of doing it every day, rather than doing a lot and then dropping it.  If practice is not done methodically, it doesn't produce results.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 20, 2020, 10:18:28 PM
Yes.  Although I'm not one to disrespect another person's practice and it's expession, when I was involved with Shambhala, it was something I couldn't get comfortable with.  It was wild.  For special occassions people would dress up, wearing their pins, which are quite nice.  But after reading Trungpa's teaching on Spiritual Materialism, I found I couldn't understand how his students  would go for something as materialistic as those merit badges.  I didn't stay in the Mandala long enough to figure it out.

Just rhe same, and despite my discomfort with the more superficial aspects of this merit badge mentality, i would later catch myself in a similar setting.  For a while, I was snatching up every empowerment I could and every practice that could lead to more.  It was same mindset but without the physical symbols. That's what brought me back to my first instruction and a simpler practice.

Right, I also went through a phase when I was getting everything, with a just-in-case mentality.  Then I realized that I could not keep the commitments and did not get any new initiations for many years.  Getting back to the basics of the path is very wise.  Vipassana practice was really valuable for me, because it gives you an idea of what you are actually doing in a Tibetan setting.

It is also really helpful to have someone supervise and direct one's practice.  A lot of teachers give great teachings, but the level they teach at is so high that it is hard for a regular person to know where to begin. 

In my limited experience, it is crucial to do two things to develop the mind and prepare it for further practice:

-- create merit
-- purify obscurations

Ngondro such as mandala offering, prostrations, and Vajrasattva practice really accomplish this. 





Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 20, 2020, 11:32:29 PM
It is also really helpful to have someone supervise and direct one's practice.

I've been fortunate.  In both the Shambhala and Kagyu communities I was a member of, members could arrange to work with specially trained mentors, to aid in the development of a strong practice and advise on or recommend steps to take.  It was a real blessing,  That fellow I offered a link for last week, Jeffrey the Meditator, was one such person and there have been others.

An interesting story about the role of such a mentor involved someone I was working with.  I had been struggling with what I call "Observer's Dilemma".  In observing something, we change it.  In practice, we rest on our breathing, watching the in and out breath.  The breath should be natural, but when observed becomes controlled.  I asked my mentor about this.  He smiled and said, "It's just another thought.".  It's not what I hoped for, but it was exactly what needed to be said.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 21, 2020, 05:26:13 PM
Excellent, excellent, Subhuti! 

Regarding Jeffrey the Meditator, he is not posting any more videos since a month ago -- hope he will resume them.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 21, 2020, 09:10:01 PM
The only problem I overall have with meditation is it seems to promote a religious belief in stillness. The way you all are talking about it (and it reflects my experiences as well) is that there needs to be a lot of experimentation and guidance in terms of developing a stable meditation practice. Given the heavily structured and quiet nature of sanghas, proper guidance rarely happens. For example, in one zen sangha i attended one of the monks met with me in private a couple of times to talk about how to better my meditation, through that I tried the burmese posture, i experimented with it at home on several occasions, and found that my legs got severely numbed by the practice. This is why i went and met with her a second time: she explained that the numbness wasn't good and that she actually had to get surgery because she had done the lotus position a lot in her youth. I was a little mad later (yet of course i didn't express it cuz it's a "sacred space") that the chants actually advocate the lotus position...

so in other words, maybe the Buddhist religion actually interferes with its noble goals of ending suffering and ignorance?
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 22, 2020, 02:33:57 AM
The only problem I overall have with meditation is it seems to promote a religious belief in stillness.

You do know that the Buddha became enlightened by meditating, right?

Quote
The way you all are talking about it (and it reflects my experiences as well) is that there needs to be a lot of experimentation and guidance in terms of developing a stable meditation practice. Given the heavily structured and quiet nature of sanghas, proper guidance rarely happens.

Most people's first contact with a practice-oriented sangha is though it's group practice sessions.  Newcomers can get instruction, and if they become members can be mentored.  If found this in Kagyu, Gelug, Nyingma, Shambhala and Zen.  I believe other Tibetan Lineages do the same.  Not sure what pure land does.


Quote
For example, in one zen sangha i attended one of the monks met with me in private a couple of times to talk about how to better my meditation, through that I tried the burmese posture, i experimented with it at home on several occasions, and found that my legs got severely numbed by the practice.  This is why i went and met with her a second time: she explained that the numbness wasn't good and that she actually had to get surgery because she had done the lotus position a lot in her youth.

Did this monk tell you that you had to use a specific posture.  I got instruction at a Zen center and they said we could use any number of postures.


Quote
I was a little mad later (yet of course i didn't express it cuz it's a "sacred space") that the chants actually advocate the lotus position...

Really?  What chants advocate the Lotus Posture for practice?  I've done sadhanas where the visualiztion include a lotus posture, but that doesn't mean you have to do it that way.

Quote
so in other words, maybe the Buddhist religion actually interferes with its noble goals of ending suffering and ignorance?

Really?  The "religion" (whatever that means)?  Maybe.  Tthe teachings?  No way.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 22, 2020, 04:47:17 PM
Well Chaz, I suppose we all have different experiences, but to me a religion is anything "bounds" you to it, as is the etymological meaning behind it. If you create a space that praises stillness and keeping your mouth shut, seems like it's going to be pretty limited in terms of what people can learn there. In my understanding buddhism always has these very stringent controls, time you wake up, what you can and can't eat, regulation of conduct, there's a never ending list of rules, which is why i choose the name "MarasAndBuddhas", because I'll probably always be more like a mara than a buddha in the mythological buddha's eyes.

And yes there was a chant in the zen center that praised the lotus position as a "perfect posture" or something similar.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 22, 2020, 06:01:35 PM
You cannot be more wrong about the "rules", M&B.  What the Buddha's teaching does, is point out the laws of cause and effect.  If you perform an action, its result will come back at you like a boomerang.  And it does not matter if the action is positive or negative, you still reap the result of it.  There is no mystique to Buddhism.  All it teaches is, if this happens, that happens, period.

Based on this, Buddhism has recommendations for what to do to become free.  This is what the precepts (refraining from killing, lying, stealing etc.) are for.  They are practical ways to purify one's mind.

You either practice to purify the mind, or you don't.  It's totally up to you.  If you are up for it, this Sangha is here to provide support as needed.  But there is little point in empty talk about this or that.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Chaz on October 22, 2020, 06:48:45 PM
Well Chaz, I suppose we all have different experiences, but to me a religion is anything "bounds" you to it, as is the etymological meaning behind it.

Take you pick:

Quote
If you create a space that praises stillness and keeping your mouth shut, seems like it's going to be pretty limited in terms of what people can learn there.

True enough but where has such a space been created?  Stillness is important in practice and contemplation, especially a group setting.  So is silence.  If you're making noise, it becomes difficult for others and it's hard to contemplate or meditate while you're talking, right?  In the sangha there are plenty of places or times where discussion is encouraged, but not everywhere.

Quote
In my understanding buddhism always has these very stringent controls, time you wake up, what you can and can't eat, regulation of conduct, there's a never ending list of rules, which is why i choose the name "MarasAndBuddhas", because I'll probably always be more like a mara than a buddha in the mythological buddha's eyes.

There are rules, yes, but remember, no one is there holding a gun to your head to make you comply.  If you want to eat meat go ahead.  If a particular group doesn't approve, then find another group.  If you can't keep the precepts don't worry.  Do what you can do with the resources available to you.

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And yes there was a chant in the zen center that praised the lotus position as a "perfect posture" or something similar.

There may be praise and yes, I suppose the Lotus posture is the "best", but if, like me,  you can't do it, then don't try.  I sit in an office chair.  The seat set to about 15".  That's perfect for me.

Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 22, 2020, 09:25:44 PM
But there is little point in empty talk about this or that.

hmmm, not sure what you mean here, if all of my thoughts about buddhism are just empty talk then so be it, but my understanding about buddhism is that all things are empty anyways, definitely not something i disagree with. You seem to be pretty sure and purposeful about what buddhism is, and I honestly applaud you for that, but for me it all still seems kinda odd, I really wanted to become a zen priest so that I could go all the way with it but it became very clear I would be unable to do it. Monastic regulation overall just seems something that would never work for me no matter the sect, so I choose to be a layperson buddhist/non-buddhist instead, but if I feel differently in time then that's that, clearly in no matter what situation I'm going to be selfishly serving my well being or acting foolishly and hurting myself, maybe both at once.
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Gibbon on October 26, 2020, 08:18:32 PM
Hi Maras and Buddhas,

Sorry for sounding a bit forceful and my meaning being unclear.  I simply mean that Buddhism is not a label to identify oneself with.  That is just simply another impediment.  So is fantasizing about being a Zen monk etc. 

What Buddhism is is the practice.  It is the whole point of the Buddha's Teaching.  Without practice, you cannot improve the Mara/Buddha ratio.  That practice happens Now.

So, if you want to try it, we are here to help.  No need to start big, but the point is to start.




Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: MarasAndBuddhas on October 27, 2020, 10:51:05 PM
Hi Maras and Buddhas,

Sorry for sounding a bit forceful and my meaning being unclear.  I simply mean that Buddhism is not a label to identify oneself with.  That is just simply another impediment.  So is fantasizing about being a Zen monk etc. 

What Buddhism is is the practice.  It is the whole point of the Buddha's Teaching.  Without practice, you cannot improve the Mara/Buddha ratio.  That practice happens Now.

So, if you want to try it, we are here to help.  No need to start big, but the point is to start.

i didn't fantasize about being a zen priest, i thought about it, on the rational that actually becoming a monk or something similar is probably the highest one can get in a buddhist training. No matter all the rules i'd have to fallow, if that leads to a more blissful life...isn't that the goal? And hence by living a peaceful blissful life, you come closer to nirvana in your lineage of lives through a better karma?
Title: Re: Tell us about your current contemplations!
Post by: Anemephistus on October 28, 2020, 01:35:31 PM
You know. It's interesting. Seeing all of you having been in formal settings the influence they have on the thinking surrounding practice and what you contemplate! I have not done any formal training, it's simply not available here so I read and meditate.

I used to have an anecdote I liked to share about the pillows....I don't use them, I use a chair. It's not that I lack respect for the pillow. But my legs do, and my lower half being entirely numb cannot bring me wisdom, it does bring me pins and needles.

If you had to pick a book about exactly what you have been contemplating, or a scripture or teaching, what would it be? Do you have a link? I would love to see them!