Author Topic: Practicing absolute humility when other's refuse it  (Read 39 times)

MarasAndBuddhas

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Practicing absolute humility when other's refuse it
« on: November 17, 2020, 05:41:41 PM »
Through a lot of my meditations and studies of Buddhist books, I've come to the conclusion that I would be better off if I were able to be un-affected by insults, yet the problem is I have always wanted that and been able to do it. Of course, I need to move in that direction through mindfulness...but it seems that on the internet, whether i react to the insult or not doesn't really make any difference. Of course in real life, it's easier to make a show of indifference especially when there are things more important than your ego at stake, yet I think I'm still really bad at this overall.

How does one mostly live for the benefit of others? That seems to be what hindu and buddhist wisdom keeps telling other people to do. It is true that if you feel like you are the protagonist in your life that just leads to suffering because you get attached to self-preservation.
When thoughts arise, then do all things arise. When thoughts vanish, then do all things vanish.

Chaz

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Re: Practicing absolute humility when other's refuse it
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2020, 07:42:54 PM »
How does one mostly live for the benefit of others?

Through practice to develop compassion.  Two such practices are Meta and Tonglen.

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It is true that if you feel like you are the protagonist in your life that just leads to suffering because you get attached to self-preservation.

Any attachment leads to suffering.